Looking at Open Source Cloud Foundry

Looking at Open Source Cloud Foundry

We have been using Pivotal’s version of Cloud Foundry for the past year and while it has a lot of nice features around it, there are a couple of things about it that I have found rather frustrating. Unfortunately, it is the very things that Pivotal adds on top of Cloud Foundry that I find the most frustrating.

The first and biggest frustration is that we haven’t been able to figure out how to effectively automate the deployment of the cloud foundry environment. While they do provide a Cloud Formation template that will build out the correct AWS bits, we found it wasn’t very good overall and ended up rewriting most of it to add some pretty important bits such as allowing us to pick our own IP addresses, encrypting the databases, and building out the subnets in multiple availability zones.

Once the cloud formation template is run and the Ops Manager is running, they provide the ability to deploy the Ops Manager Director (Bosh) tile that will then allow you to deploy the Elastic Runtime tile (Cloud Foundry). To deploy these tiles, you must click through a number of web forms and fill in the values that you want to use. While this may work well for the novice, I want to be able to deploy a cloud foundry from scratch using automation, not clicking through a bunch of web forms.

The web forms also point to the second big complaint (which admittedly may be a feature for some) is how much Pivotal obfuscates the inner workings of Cloud Foundry. Initially we took advantage of this when deploying the app, but as we ran it and the need for troubleshooting came up it became much more annoying. Not knowing where to go to look at logs, how to log in (properly) and how to check on system health became more of a problem as we started to run more production workloads.

So we have decided to look at standing up an open source Cloud Foundry environment to see if having more direct control over the pieces will allow us to better automate and support our infrastructure. The tools that I have chosen to build out our proof of concept (POC) environment are: Terraform, Ansible, and Jenkins. I’ll be using a lot of the hacks and tricks that we have learned over the last year in our Pivotal environment.

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